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Amgen Sets Guinness World Records? Title for Most Osteoporosis Scans in 24 Hours

On May 5th, 2019, Amgen Canada, located in Mississauga, Ontario, was one of nine Amgen affiliates working together around the world to successfully set the Guinness World Records title for the most osteoporosis screenings completed in 24 hours.

“Bone health matters a great deal,” says Dr. Ponda Motsepe-Ditshego, Executive Medical Director, Amgen Canada. “That’s why it is so important to help make men and women and their loved ones aware about bone health and osteoporosis, and to encourage them to talk to their doctor to learn more.”

Many women know all too well what to expect during menopause - hot flashes, mood swings and difficulty sleeping. But what they don’t expect after menopause is an increased risk for osteoporosis.

Throughout a woman’s life, estrogen plays an important role in replacing older porous bones with newer dense bone. However, during menopause, the body starts to produce less estrogen. Over time this can lead to osteoporosis - a disease that weakens bones and makes them more likely to break. Osteoporosis is often called a “silent” disease, because bone loss cannot be seen or felt. As a result, many women don’t know they have it until they break a bone.

Even though a woman is feeling great on the outside, her bones could be telling a different story on the inside. If ignored, osteoporosis can jeopardize a woman’s ability to do things she loves and get around on her own. That’s because bone breaks due to osteoporosis can occur in critical parts of the body, including the hip, pelvis and spine. And once a bone is broken due to osteoporosis, a woman is much more likely to break another bone within her lifetime.

“The more we know, the better equipped we are to take charge of our bone health,” says Dr. Motsepe-Ditshego.

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